West African Peanut Stew

West African Peanut Stew

This plant-based recipe makes the perfect mid-week dinner. Have on its own, or serve with brown rice for a more filling evening meal. It's great as a packed lunch the next day too.

Serves: 4. Takes: 1 hour. 

Ingredients:

  • 3 red onions 
  • 2 tablespoons of peanut oil 
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled and diced 
  • 1 large thumb of ginger, grated 
  • Large bunch of coriander, roughly 30g 
  • 1 sweet potato, approx 250g diced 
  • 1 tablespoon of ground cumin 
  • 1⁄2 a scotch bonnet, (de-seeded if you don’t like it too spicy) finely chopped 
  • 1 x 400g can of tinned tomatoes 
  • 4 tablespoons of Pip & Nut Smooth Peanut Butter 
  • 750ml of good quality vegetable stock 
  • 200g bunch of greens i.e. kale, Swiss chard or cavolo nero
  • 1 lemon 
  • 100g toasted peanuts, chopped 

Method:

Peel and finely chop 2 of the red onions. Add to a large heavy-bottom saucepan over a medium heat along with the oil. Fry for about 8 minutes or until the onions are soft and sweet. 

Add the chopped garlic and grated ginger and fry for a couple more minutes. Finely chop the stalks of the coriander and add to the pan. 

Toss in the sweet potato and ground cumin and fry for a further minute. Add the chopped chilli, tinned tomatoes, and peanut butter and give it a good mix. Pour in the veg stock and place a lid on and leave to simmer for 15-20 minutes or until the sweet potato is soft. 

Peel and half the remaining red onion and finely slice. Add to a small bowl and squeeze over the juice of the lemon. Give it a really good scrunch and leave to pickle. 

Once the stew has had its time, roughly shred the greens and add to the pan give it a good mix and leave to cook for another 5 minutes. Ladle into bowls and top with the pickled onions, a little coriander and a sprinkling of toasted peanuts. 

Pip’s Top Tip: Remember to give your nut butter a good stir before using it, as the oils can naturally separate. This is because there is no palm oil in any of our nut butters, which is often added to stop this natural separation.